Ovariohysterectomy

Ovariohysterectomy (also known as a spay) refers to the surgical procedure performed on female dogs and cats to render them infertile. There are many benefits to spaying your female companion. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, an ovariohysterectomy will eliminate the sometimes ‘messy’ heat cycles that attract male dogs and cats to your house from miles away and cause behavioural changes in your pets. Third, you will help prevent serious diseases in your pet such as pyometra (infection in the uterus) and mammary cancer.

Castration

Castration (also known as neutering) refers to the surgical procedure performed on male dogs and cats to render them infertile. There are many benefits to castrating your male companion. First, you will contribute to the prevention of the dog and cat overpopulation. Second, castrating will eliminate some undesirable and roaming behaviours in your male companion and aid in addressing some types of aggressive behaviour. Third, you will help prevent diseases in your pet such as prostate disease and testicular cancer.

Soft Tissue Surgery

Orthopedic Surgery 

Soft tissue surgery includes surgeries not associated with bone. Examples of soft tissue surgeries and their benefits are listed below.

One of the most common soft tissue surgeries performed is the removal of masses or ‘lumps’ on our pet patients. Most of these masses or ‘lumps’, once removed and tested, are benign (non-harmful); however, occasionally they are more serious. Early removal and accurate diagnosis of a ‘lump’ is necessary to improve the outcome in your pet if the mass is cancerous.

Lacerations are another common soft tissue surgery in pets, suturing will reduce the chance of infection, improve healing time and reduce scarring.

Orthopedic surgery refers to bone surgery. There are many different situations where bone surgery may be necessary including leg fractures, hip dysplasia, etc. Most orthopedic surgeries can be performed at our hospital. On ocassion our patients must be referred to a veterinary referral hospital to be treated with specialized equipment or intensive care during complex surgeries.

For CCL tears (ACL in humans/torn cruciate ligament) we use two different techniques. For smaller dogs we use a lateral suture technique for larger dogs we use a tight rope technique. 

Anesthesia

The type of anesthesia we use depends on the procedure. Some require general anesthesia, while others may only call for local anesthesia. For more specific information on our protocols, contact us with any questions.